Understanding Your Home Inspection Report

After pouring through real estate news, studying up on loans and neighborhoods, attending myriads of open houses and even digging into house hunting online – most home buyers feel like they are true real estate experts. However, for all but the most handy of house hunters, getting into really looking at the house shows just how little most people actually know about the nuts and bolts of what is probably the largest purchase they’ll ever make.

So YOU make the right decision and schedule a home inspection. You even attend the inspection and ask what you think are all the right questions – then get the report and find it reads with a whole different language then what you were speaking at the time of inspection. Terms like “serviceable condition…”, “monitor…”, “conducive to decay…”, “satisfactory to…” What do these along with the other comments and ratings ACTUALLY mean to you the home buyer?

Here’s a few pointers to help you translate the report into something you can really use.

1. The best home inspectors are even keeled, objective and “Just the Facts” is their byline. They’re not alarmists and they don’t try to play down the importance of things. Sometimes that straightforwardness can make it confusing and difficult for you, the buyer, to know what’s a really big deal and what’s not – whether you should move forward with the purchase, what to plan ahead for; whether to re-negotiate or walk way.

As a home inspector I’ve categorized things as a safety hazard that a couple hours and less than $100 would fix. For example a bathroom faucet with the hot and cold supply lines reversed. On the other hand you might see a simple line like “extensive earth to wood contact observed” that after further inspection opens a pretty pricey can of worms.

A home inspector shouldn’t provide you with a repair bid and in most cases won’t go into what the repairs (if any are needed) would entail, their job is to inspect and report. That being said, 9 times out of 10 they probably will verbally give you the information you might need to help you understand whether the situation is a serious problem or what you may be looking at down the road.

2. Many times I am asked by the home buyer accompanying me on an inspection, “Who should I get to fix that?” Personally I don’t recommend anyone because it’s an uncomfortable conflict of interest for me but instead I suggest they ask their local real estate agents because they know the area, who’s reputable and who isn’t. The other answer may be as simple as “You don’t need to hire anyone, go down to the hardware store and pick up a _____, here’s where it goes. I’m not sure how much it will cost but it probably won’t be much.” Either way, go ahead and ask your inspector – you’ll probably find out that most of the items in the home inspection report will probably be DIY items or maintenance issues. Even if you’re uncomfortable at first with handling DIY items, a couple of You Tube videos and some advice from the clerk at the hardware store should help you get into the projects. Either way you’ll know more about the issue at hand and whether you should hire someone to do the small fixes.

3. The second most popular question is “What would you do if this was your house? What would you fix and when?” The home inspector’s job is to point out everything, within the scope of the inspection that might need repair, replacement, maintenance, further inspection – or what might be on its last leg. They also are experienced enough with homes to know that no home is perfect. For example, if you ask “What would you (the home inspector) do with an item described as “at the end of its serviceable lifetime?” The might say “If it were mine, I wouldn’t do a thing to it. Just know that it could break in the next 5 months, or in the next 5 years. Keep your home warranty in effect, because that should cover it when it does break.”

“What would you do if this was your house? What would you fix and when?” is a good question because it puts you in the position to:

Understand better what does and doesn’t need to be repaired immediately
Better prioritize the work you plan to do to the home (budget or renegotiate accordingly)
Understand and get used to constant maintenance that comes along with home ownership
Understand the importance of a good home warranty plan.

4. A common scenario is to get home, open up the inspection report and have no clue whatsoever what he or she was referring to when they pointed out the wax ring that needs replacement or the TPR valve that is improperly installed. Your best bet for better understanding the home inspection report is to ask the inspector ( at the end of the inspection) to walk through the house with you to point out all the items they’ve noted needing repair, maintenance or further inspection. This way when you get the report you’ll have a better understanding of what and where the various items in the report belong. (Make sure your inspector includes as many pictures as necessary in their report.)

The bottom line is; if at all possible, arrange to attend your home inspection. This will be well worth it when you receive your report and you’re able to recognize each item and understand what the comments actually are referring to. At the end of the day, the home inspection report is just that – an objective report on the operations of the basic systems found in a house. It’s going to be up to you to follow up and ask the right questions that will help in making the right decisions for you when it comes time to purchase the home.

Understanding Your Home Inspection Report

After pouring through real estate news, studying up on loans and neighborhoods, attending myriads of open houses and even digging into house hunting online – most home buyers feel like they are true real estate experts. However, for all but the most handy of house hunters, getting into really looking at the house shows just how little most people actually know about the nuts and bolts of what is probably the largest purchase they’ll ever make.

So YOU make the right decision and schedule a home inspection. You even attend the inspection and ask what you think are all the right questions – then get the report and find it reads with a whole different language then what you were speaking at the time of inspection. Terms like “serviceable condition…”, “monitor…”, “conducive to decay…”, “satisfactory to…” What do these along with the other comments and ratings ACTUALLY mean to you the home buyer?

Here’s a few pointers to help you translate the report into something you can really use.

1. The best home inspectors are even keeled, objective and “Just the Facts” is their byline. They’re not alarmists and they don’t try to play down the importance of things. Sometimes that straightforwardness can make it confusing and difficult for you, the buyer, to know what’s a really big deal and what’s not – whether you should move forward with the purchase, what to plan ahead for; whether to re-negotiate or walk way.

As a home inspector I’ve categorized things as a safety hazard that a couple hours and less than $100 would fix. For example a bathroom faucet with the hot and cold supply lines reversed. On the other hand you might see a simple line like “extensive earth to wood contact observed” that after further inspection opens a pretty pricey can of worms.

A home inspector shouldn’t provide you with a repair bid and in most cases won’t go into what the repairs (if any are needed) would entail, their job is to inspect and report. That being said, 9 times out of 10 they probably will verbally give you the information you might need to help you understand whether the situation is a serious problem or what you may be looking at down the road.

2. Many times I am asked by the home buyer accompanying me on an inspection, “Who should I get to fix that?” Personally I don’t recommend anyone because it’s an uncomfortable conflict of interest for me but instead I suggest they ask their local real estate agents because they know the area, who’s reputable and who isn’t. The other answer may be as simple as “You don’t need to hire anyone, go down to the hardware store and pick up a _____, here’s where it goes. I’m not sure how much it will cost but it probably won’t be much.” Either way, go ahead and ask your inspector – you’ll probably find out that most of the items in the home inspection report will probably be DIY items or maintenance issues. Even if you’re uncomfortable at first with handling DIY items, a couple of You Tube videos and some advice from the clerk at the hardware store should help you get into the projects. Either way you’ll know more about the issue at hand and whether you should hire someone to do the small fixes.

3. The second most popular question is “What would you do if this was your house? What would you fix and when?” The home inspector’s job is to point out everything, within the scope of the inspection that might need repair, replacement, maintenance, further inspection – or what might be on its last leg. They also are experienced enough with homes to know that no home is perfect. For example, if you ask “What would you (the home inspector) do with an item described as “at the end of its serviceable lifetime?” The might say “If it were mine, I wouldn’t do a thing to it. Just know that it could break in the next 5 months, or in the next 5 years. Keep your home warranty in effect, because that should cover it when it does break.”

“What would you do if this was your house? What would you fix and when?” is a good question because it puts you in the position to:

Understand better what does and doesn’t need to be repaired immediately
Better prioritize the work you plan to do to the home (budget or renegotiate accordingly)
Understand and get used to constant maintenance that comes along with home ownership
Understand the importance of a good home warranty plan.

4. A common scenario is to get home, open up the inspection report and have no clue whatsoever what he or she was referring to when they pointed out the wax ring that needs replacement or the TPR valve that is improperly installed. Your best bet for better understanding the home inspection report is to ask the inspector ( at the end of the inspection) to walk through the house with you to point out all the items they’ve noted needing repair, maintenance or further inspection. This way when you get the report you’ll have a better understanding of what and where the various items in the report belong. (Make sure your inspector includes as many pictures as necessary in their report.)

The bottom line is; if at all possible, arrange to attend your home inspection. This will be well worth it when you receive your report and you’re able to recognize each item and understand what the comments actually are referring to. At the end of the day, the home inspection report is just that – an objective report on the operations of the basic systems found in a house. It’s going to be up to you to follow up and ask the right questions that will help in making the right decisions for you when it comes time to purchase the home.

Is a Home Inspection Necessary?

If you are in the midst of buying a house or contemplating buying a home sometime in the near future the topic of a home inspection will come up. Do you need one? Are you required to have the home inspected? Are you required to have a home inspected. In some cases the answer is yes. Some cities require that a home be inspected if it is being purchased through land contract. However in most cases that answer is no, it is not required.

Financial organizations may require certain inspections not covered by a basic home inspection. These often required inspections are, well and septic, gas line inspection and warranty and of course a termite inspection.

There tends to be the belief that if a home is brand new or newer that there is no need to have a home inspection done. I admit that there are usually fewer issues with newer homes. There area however always some issues. Some issues can be very serious.

Several years ago I did a home inspection of a newly constructed home that had gone through and passed the final county inspection 3 months before I was contacted to do the inspection on it for the buyer. While in the home I noticed a low spot in the floor in the kitchen area of this property. I save looking at the crawl space last when I do inspections because these areas are often dirty and I would rather not bring dirt into a home. Because of the low spot in the floor I knew there was something to look at below. When I got into the crawl space the issue was very obvious.

The cause for the low spot was that someone had cut away a three foot section of the main support beam in crawl space under that area. The section of support was removed to make room for heating duct work. This was the cause of the floor sag. In this same house the cross bracing for the floor joists were not connected. Not a single one was installed completely. Sloppy lazy work by the builder and also by the county or city inspector who missed it.

Is a Home Inspection Necessary?

If you are in the midst of buying a house or contemplating buying a home sometime in the near future the topic of a home inspection will come up. Do you need one? Are you required to have the home inspected? Are you required to have a home inspected. In some cases the answer is yes. Some cities require that a home be inspected if it is being purchased through land contract. However in most cases that answer is no, it is not required.

Financial organizations may require certain inspections not covered by a basic home inspection. These often required inspections are, well and septic, gas line inspection and warranty and of course a termite inspection.

There tends to be the belief that if a home is brand new or newer that there is no need to have a home inspection done. I admit that there are usually fewer issues with newer homes. There area however always some issues. Some issues can be very serious.

Several years ago I did a home inspection of a newly constructed home that had gone through and passed the final county inspection 3 months before I was contacted to do the inspection on it for the buyer. While in the home I noticed a low spot in the floor in the kitchen area of this property. I save looking at the crawl space last when I do inspections because these areas are often dirty and I would rather not bring dirt into a home. Because of the low spot in the floor I knew there was something to look at below. When I got into the crawl space the issue was very obvious.

The cause for the low spot was that someone had cut away a three foot section of the main support beam in crawl space under that area. The section of support was removed to make room for heating duct work. This was the cause of the floor sag. In this same house the cross bracing for the floor joists were not connected. Not a single one was installed completely. Sloppy lazy work by the builder and also by the county or city inspector who missed it.

In other brand new homes I have found missing insulation and damaged roof vents, I have also found gas leaks and water leaks in a home that was the model home for a building development. Always have a home inspection.

Builders and county inspectors are human and therefore not perfect. It is always to good idea to have another person take a look and help you determine if there are problems and where they are.

Jim Troth is a full time home inspector in Ohio and the Education Coordinator for InterNachi Ohio. He has grown his home inspection business during the downturn of real estate. He attributes the growth to excellent customer service and referrals from satisfied clients. He provides home inspections in the Columbus, Hilliard, Powell, Pickerington, Pataskala, New Albany, Delaware, Gahanna, Westerville, Galloway, Grove City, Worthington, Dublin, Marysville, London, Mechanicsburg and other cities surrounding Columbus, Ohio.

Home Inspection Tools: What You’ll Need For Your Home Inspection Business

So you’ve completed home inspection training and finished all your certifications. Now it’s time to go shopping. There’s always been a debate over what you should or should not inspect and what kinds of tools you should use or not use in the field. This guide isn’t meant to tell you what you should or should not inspect, but rather give you a list of the most common tools that home inspectors use and let you decide for yourself. Here is a general list of home inspection tools that many inspectors own:

Tool belt and carry bag: A large carry bag will carry all your bigger items and accessories. A tool belt is usually used to carry a flash light and smaller items such as electrical testers and screwdrivers.

Flashlights: Most inspectors have at least two or three flashlights. A very handy light is a head light that is used hands free for attics and crawl spaces. You’ll also need a large spot light type in case there are areas you can’t get to. A small pocket light is also convenient to carry in your front pocket for quick access.

Screw drivers: Screw drivers are used for various tasks. You never want to be without a variety of them.

Shoe covers: Keeping a fresh supply of shoe covers will keep home owners and realtors happy. The cheap thin plastic blue ones work just fine and will keep you from tracking dirt and mud all over the house. These can be purchased in bulk from most tool supply companies.

Inspection Mirror: A telescoping inspection mirror will help you inspect those hard to reach areas. Typical sizes are 1 ½” round mirrors and 2″ x 3″ rectangular.

Measuring tape: Tape measures are used for different measurements such as room size and window height. Many times the home buyer will need one to measure for furniture so it’s always nice to lend them yours if they don’t have one.

Electrical GFCI outlet tester: A GFCI tester is used to test the proper function of GFCI outlets and will also detect non grounded outlets, switched wires, and a few other things. The cost of an inexpensive model is around $12-$20. You can also purchase the more expensive digital testers that have more features and capabilities. These can cost up to a few hundred dollars.

Ladders: Most inspectors carry at least one extendable ladder and one step ladder. The little giant series makes a great product but make sure to get the non-conductive type. Aluminum ladders don’t go well with power lines. There is also a ladder called Xtend and Climb which seems to be fairly popular.

Binoculars: Some inspectors walk on the roof and some don’t, it’s a personal choice. If you do decide to walk on the roof there may still be times when it’s unsafe to climb on the roof. It’s always nice to have a good set of binoculars in case you need to inspect from your ladder.

Digital camera: A good digital camera is a must have these days. Clients expect to see color photos of any discrepancies that you find. A decent quality camera will make it much easier to focus in low light areas and get you a clear shot the first time around. You can find good quality used cameras on eBay for around $100-$200.

Combustible Gas Detector and carbon monoxide tester: These are used for checking gas leaks and carbon monoxide. You can purchase these separately or buy an all in one tool that will check both.

Voltage Detector: A good voltage tester can save your life. Instead of using the back of your hand to test for voltage, pick up a voltage detector for panel covers and rogue wires.

Probe (a sharpened Phillips screwdriver works well): A probe is a good tool to use to check for termite damage and dry rot.

Thermometer: A good thermometer will help you check the outside temperature and also test the AC system. There are several different options available, including infrared versions that can test temperatures from several feet away.

Moisture Meter: If you see a stain it’s a good idea to test it with a moisture meter to see if it’s active. There are also models that have longer probes. These are great for inserting into the walls to check for exterior leaks. If you’re testing for EIFS this is a must have.

Extra batteries and light bulbs: It’s always good to keep a supply of extra batteries and light bulbs on hand.

A computer and home inspection software: Hand written reports are becoming obsolete. Providing your clients with a typed report that includes color photos will ensure that you’re running a professional business. Inspectors usually use one of the following three reporting methods:

1. Take hand written notes on a clipboard on site, then complete the report on a desktop computer when they get back to the office.

2. Bring a laptop to the inspection and put it in a central area such as the kitchen counter. Then inspect one section and fill it out on the computer before moving to the next. 3. Take a tablet touch screen and fill out the report while inspecting the home.

Coveralls: To keep your clothes from getting dirty in the crawl space and attic, it’s a good idea to invest in a set of coveralls or disposable paint suits.

Leather gloves: When you’re crawling around under a home it’s important to protect your hands. You might encounter spiders, snakes, sharp objects, or just plain nastiness, so a good set of gloves is a must have.

Protective Face masks: You never know when the insulation in an attic might contain asbestos. There can also be harmful mold spores if you’re sensitive to mold. A good safety mask can help protect you in these situations.

Pen and notebooks: Always carry a pen and notepad with you. If your computer crashes or your forgot to charge your battery the night before, you’ll be glad you did. It’s also a good idea to carry a backup printed copy of your inspection checklist in your vehicle.

Power screwdriver or power drill: These are great for removing crawl space access covers and electrical panel covers.

Thick rubber shoe covers: These are made of thick rubber and slipped on over your shoes. They snap in place so they won’t fall off. Unlike the thin covers used to walk inside the home, these are made of thick rubber and will keep your shoes from getting scratched and muddy in the crawl space. They can usually be found at farm supply stores.

Here are a few other tools to consider:

Knee pads
Knife
Humidity tester
See snake camera
Septic Die test tablets for checking for water leaks and faulty septic systems.

This list of home inspection tools will hopefully give you a good idea of where to start. There are several companies online that specialize in selling home inspection tools. First, you could try searching in Google and visit some of the major inspection tool distributors. eBay is also a great place to pick up good quality new and used tools, usually at a reduced price. Feel free to leave comments and suggestions below and I’ll update the list if there’s something I missed.

Home Inspection Tools: What You’ll Need For Your Home Inspection Business

So you’ve completed home inspection training and finished all your certifications. Now it’s time to go shopping. There’s always been a debate over what you should or should not inspect and what kinds of tools you should use or not use in the field. This guide isn’t meant to tell you what you should or should not inspect, but rather give you a list of the most common tools that home inspectors use and let you decide for yourself. Here is a general list of home inspection tools that many inspectors own:

Tool belt and carry bag: A large carry bag will carry all your bigger items and accessories. A tool belt is usually used to carry a flash light and smaller items such as electrical testers and screwdrivers.

Flashlights: Most inspectors have at least two or three flashlights. A very handy light is a head light that is used hands free for attics and crawl spaces. You’ll also need a large spot light type in case there are areas you can’t get to. A small pocket light is also convenient to carry in your front pocket for quick access.

Screw drivers: Screw drivers are used for various tasks. You never want to be without a variety of them.

Shoe covers: Keeping a fresh supply of shoe covers will keep home owners and realtors happy. The cheap thin plastic blue ones work just fine and will keep you from tracking dirt and mud all over the house. These can be purchased in bulk from most tool supply companies.

Inspection Mirror: A telescoping inspection mirror will help you inspect those hard to reach areas. Typical sizes are 1 ½” round mirrors and 2″ x 3″ rectangular.

Measuring tape: Tape measures are used for different measurements such as room size and window height. Many times the home buyer will need one to measure for furniture so it’s always nice to lend them yours if they don’t have one.

Electrical GFCI outlet tester: A GFCI tester is used to test the proper function of GFCI outlets and will also detect non grounded outlets, switched wires, and a few other things. The cost of an inexpensive model is around $12-$20. You can also purchase the more expensive digital testers that have more features and capabilities. These can cost up to a few hundred dollars.

Ladders: Most inspectors carry at least one extendable ladder and one step ladder. The little giant series makes a great product but make sure to get the non-conductive type. Aluminum ladders don’t go well with power lines. There is also a ladder called Xtend and Climb which seems to be fairly popular.

Binoculars: Some inspectors walk on the roof and some don’t, it’s a personal choice. If you do decide to walk on the roof there may still be times when it’s unsafe to climb on the roof. It’s always nice to have a good set of binoculars in case you need to inspect from your ladder.

Digital camera: A good digital camera is a must have these days. Clients expect to see color photos of any discrepancies that you find. A decent quality camera will make it much easier to focus in low light areas and get you a clear shot the first time around. You can find good quality used cameras on eBay for around $100-$200.

Combustible Gas Detector and carbon monoxide tester: These are used for checking gas leaks and carbon monoxide. You can purchase these separately or buy an all in one tool that will check both.

Voltage Detector: A good voltage tester can save your life. Instead of using the back of your hand to test for voltage, pick up a voltage detector for panel covers and rogue wires.

Probe (a sharpened Phillips screwdriver works well): A probe is a good tool to use to check for termite damage and dry rot.

Thermometer: A good thermometer will help you check the outside temperature and also test the AC system. There are several different options available, including infrared versions that can test temperatures from several feet away.

Moisture Meter: If you see a stain it’s a good idea to test it with a moisture meter to see if it’s active. There are also models that have longer probes. These are great for inserting into the walls to check for exterior leaks. If you’re testing for EIFS this is a must have.

Extra batteries and light bulbs: It’s always good to keep a supply of extra batteries and light bulbs on hand.

A computer and home inspection software: Hand written reports are becoming obsolete. Providing your clients with a typed report that includes color photos will ensure that you’re running a professional business. Inspectors usually use one of the following three reporting methods:

1. Take hand written notes on a clipboard on site, then complete the report on a desktop computer when they get back to the office.

2. Bring a laptop to the inspection and put it in a central area such as the kitchen counter. Then inspect one section and fill it out on the computer before moving to the next. 3. Take a tablet touch screen and fill out the report while inspecting the home.

Coveralls: To keep your clothes from getting dirty in the crawl space and attic, it’s a good idea to invest in a set of coveralls or disposable paint suits.

Leather gloves: When you’re crawling around under a home it’s important to protect your hands. You might encounter spiders, snakes, sharp objects, or just plain nastiness, so a good set of gloves is a must have.

Protective Face masks: You never know when the insulation in an attic might contain asbestos. There can also be harmful mold spores if you’re sensitive to mold. A good safety mask can help protect you in these situations.

Pen and notebooks: Always carry a pen and notepad with you. If your computer crashes or your forgot to charge your battery the night before, you’ll be glad you did. It’s also a good idea to carry a backup printed copy of your inspection checklist in your vehicle.

Power screwdriver or power drill: These are great for removing crawl space access covers and electrical panel covers.

Thick rubber shoe covers: These are made of thick rubber and slipped on over your shoes. They snap in place so they won’t fall off. Unlike the thin covers used to walk inside the home, these are made of thick rubber and will keep your shoes from getting scratched and muddy in the crawl space. They can usually be found at farm supply stores.

Here are a few other tools to consider:

Knee pads
Knife
Humidity tester
See snake camera
Septic Die test tablets for checking for water leaks and faulty septic systems.

This list of home inspection tools will hopefully give you a good idea of where to start. There are several companies online that specialize in selling home inspection tools. First, you could try searching in Google and visit some of the major inspection tool distributors. eBay is also a great place to pick up good quality new and used tools, usually at a reduced price. Feel free to leave comments and suggestions below and I’ll update the list if there’s something I missed.

The Main Types of Home Inspections

Most people, that have either bought a home in the past or that are considering such a purchase, are familiar with Home Inspections. A widely accepted and succinct definition of a Home Inspection is:

A home inspection is an objective visual examination of the physical structure and systems of a house, from the roof to the foundation.

A thorough home inspection should include a general and visual assessment of all parts of the home in accordance with a set of prescribed or adopted standards. There are different types of inspections…with those different types having a bit more to do with the clients intended use of the home inspection report rather than of any significant variations in the inspection process itself.

Some of the different types of Home Inspections as they relate to intended use are:

The Pre-Purchase Inspection – This is, by far, the most common type of inspection; it’s performed for and on behalf of a client that is buying a home. They want to know the condition of the home before they buy it…that makes sense, right?

The Pre-Listing Inspection – This is an inspection that’s performed for the selling party…the people that might be selling their home. Typically, this type of inspection is accomplished prior to the home being placed for sale on the market. The seller wants to know about the condition of the home so that there are minimal surprises once the home has gone under contract. This type of inspection is sometimes referred to as a Sellers Inspection

Consult Inspection – Sometimes, a person might want to know about a particular aspect of their home…they might not want to know about everything that might be wrong but are concerned about a single aspect of a home…say, the condition of the roof. This type of inspection is sometimes referred to a Consult Inspection or a Single-Item inspection and might be appropriate for some people in certain circumstances.

New Construction Inspection – This is a very common type of inspection conducted for the buyer of a newly completed home.

The 11 Month Warranty Inspection – This inspection is commonly requested by a home-owner who has purchased a newly constructed home and is nearing the end of their 1 Year warranty period. It helps to identify issues that might need to be corrected under the builders warranty program.

The Main Types of Home Inspections

Most people, that have either bought a home in the past or that are considering such a purchase, are familiar with Home Inspections. A widely accepted and succinct definition of a Home Inspection is:

A home inspection is an objective visual examination of the physical structure and systems of a house, from the roof to the foundation.

A thorough home inspection should include a general and visual assessment of all parts of the home in accordance with a set of prescribed or adopted standards. There are different types of inspections…with those different types having a bit more to do with the clients intended use of the home inspection report rather than of any significant variations in the inspection process itself.

Some of the different types of Home Inspections as they relate to intended use are:

The Pre-Purchase Inspection – This is, by far, the most common type of inspection; it’s performed for and on behalf of a client that is buying a home. They want to know the condition of the home before they buy it…that makes sense, right?

The Pre-Listing Inspection – This is an inspection that’s performed for the selling party…the people that might be selling their home. Typically, this type of inspection is accomplished prior to the home being placed for sale on the market. The seller wants to know about the condition of the home so that there are minimal surprises once the home has gone under contract. This type of inspection is sometimes referred to as a Sellers Inspection

Consult Inspection – Sometimes, a person might want to know about a particular aspect of their home…they might not want to know about everything that might be wrong but are concerned about a single aspect of a home…say, the condition of the roof. This type of inspection is sometimes referred to a Consult Inspection or a Single-Item inspection and might be appropriate for some people in certain circumstances.

New Construction Inspection – This is a very common type of inspection conducted for the buyer of a newly completed home.

The 11 Month Warranty Inspection – This inspection is commonly requested by a home-owner who has purchased a newly constructed home and is nearing the end of their 1 Year warranty period. It helps to identify issues that might need to be corrected under the builders warranty program.